Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 1990  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 279-284

Psychological Aspects of Haematological Malignancies


1 Additional Professor, Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India
2 Additional Professor, Internal Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India
3 Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India
4 Assistant Research Scientist, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India

Correspondence Address:
P Kulhara
Additional Professor, Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21927472

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Sixty nine patients with various types of haematological malignancies were studied. Chronic myeloid leukaemia (n =32) was the commonest diagnosis. The patients were assessed on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, PGI-N, Health Questionnaire and Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale and those who had scores above the cut off points for Hamilton Rating Scale and/or PGI-N2 Health Questionnaire were assessed on Present State Examination. The patients were followed up at 3 and 6 months interval. At 3 months 51 patients were re-assessed whilst at 6 months only 26 could be re-evaluated. There were no significant changes in scores of Hamilton Rating scale and PGI-N2 Health Questionnaire at intake and subsequent follow-up assessments. No significant correlations between stressful life experience and severity of illness emerged. Twenty nine patients were interviewed on Present State Examination and of these 20 had diagnosable depressive neuroses- From consultation liaison psychiatric point of view, provision of psychiatric help to these patients is discussed.



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