Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 1085 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed531    
    Printed25    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded58    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
ARTICLE
Year : 1991  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16-19

EMG Biofeedback II : The Dose-Response Relationship


1 Clinical Psychologist, Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore-560029, India
2 Additional Professor, Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore-560029, India
3 Associate Professor, Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore-560029, India

Correspondence Address:
D Sargunaraj
Clinical Psychologist, Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences, Bangalore-560029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21897456

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

36 clients with anxiety neurosis were trained to reduce frontalis muscle tension over two phases of ten sessions each. They were assessed on psychological and physiological measures, before, during and after the phases. The data analysis indicated that the clients succeeded in lowering frontalis muscle tension levels during the feedback and no-feedback phases of the training sessions. The inter-correlations among the outcome measures indicated that with an increasing amount of control of muscle tensior, the clients perceived greater amounts of change in state anxiety and in anxiety symptoms. This implies that EMG biofeedback can effect cognitive changes in clients.



[PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article