Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 1993  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 51-53

A Study on Emotional Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury


1 Lecturer in Psychiatry, Department of Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla, Orissa, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla, Orissa, India
3 Associate Professor & Head, Department of Psychiatry, MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, Orissa, India

Correspondence Address:
N.M M Rath
Lecturer in Psychiatry, Department of Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla, Orissa
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21776170

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Spinal Cord Injury, as an illness, is catastrophic, chronic and at times terminal, leading to overwhelming psycho-social decompensation. One is concerned with physical realities, pain, paralysis, and impotency as well as with tasks and goals in patients' life. A study of psychological consequences and mental morbidity was observed in twenty persons affected with spinal cord injury over three months to twelve years. Eight of twenty patients presented with neurotic disorders, five with intense depression, four with depersonalization, and four with paranoid states in various phases. Impaired social adjustment was observed in five patients. Like the fabulous 'Phoenix' rising out of its own ashes, three patients turned supportive to others in similar situations transcending emotional, physical and social disability.



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