Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 1994  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 103-120

Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism in Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders


Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Professor of Radiology, Box 3972, Duke University Medical Centre, Durham, North Carolina 27710, India

Correspondence Address:
Roy J Mathew
Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Professor of Radiology, Box 3972, Duke University Medical Centre, Durham, North Carolina 27710
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21743685

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Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disorders. Possible associations between stress I anxiety I panic and cerebral ischemia I stroke give additional significance to the effects of anxiety on CBF. With the advent of non-invasive techniques, study of CBF/CMR in anxiety disorders became easier. A large numbers of research reports are available on the effects of stress, anxiety and panic on CBF/CMR in normals and anxiety disorder patients. This article reviews the available human research on this topic.



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