Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 1996  |  Volume : 38  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13-22

Neurodevelopmental Theories of Schizophernia : Application to Late-Onset Schizophernia


Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego; V.A Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive Lo Jolla, CA 92961, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dilip V Jeste
Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego; V.A Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive Lo Jolla, CA 92961
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21584112

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A review of literature on the neurodevelopmental origins of schizophemia is presented, with particular attention to neurodevelopmental processes in late-onset schizophemia. Definitions of the term "neurodevelopmental" as used in schizophernia literature are first provided. Next, evidence for the developmental origins of the neuropathology in schizophemia is reviewed. This evidence includes studies of the associations between schizophemia and neurodevelopmental brain aberrations, minor physical anomalies, obstetric complications, prenatal viral exposure, childhood neuromotor abnormalities, and pandysmaturation. A brief discussion of the predominant theories about the neurodevelopmental origins of schizophemia is then provided. The concept and nature of "late-onset schizophenia "is next defined and discussed. Finally, the neurodevelopmental literature is discussed in relation to the phenomenon of late-onset schizophemia. Based on this review, we conclude that there exists a strong likelihood that late-onset schizophrenia involves neurodevelopmental processes.



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