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ARTICLE
Year : 1997  |  Volume : 39  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 313-317

Psychiatric Sequelae of Amputation : I Immediate Effects


1 Psychiatrist, Medical Officer, Provincial Medical Services, Basti, India
2 Professor, Department of Psychiatry K.G.'s Medical College, Lucknow, India
3 Professor & Head (Retd), Department of Orthopedics K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
4 Associate Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
5 Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry K.G.'s Medical College, Lucknow, India
6 Senior Resident, Department of Psychiatry K.G.'s Medical College, Lucknow, India
7 Senior Statistician, Department of Psychiatry K.G.'s Medical College, Lucknow, India

Correspondence Address:
J K Trivedi
Professor, Department of Psychiatry K.G.'s Medical College, Lucknow
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21584099

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Twenty-five subjects, who had undergone amputation within last 6 weeks, were studied for psychiatric complications, including phantom limb phenomena. The patients were interviewed on SCID, HRSD and HARS. Out of a total of 25 subjects, 8 (34.6%) developed psychiatric disorders - PTSD and major depression. The whole sample was thus divided into 2 groups-sick and nonsick. Phantom limb was seen in 88% subjects. No significant difference was present between the two groups with regard to presence of phantom, its associated phenomena of pain, telescopy and movement. A statistically significant difference was seen in psychiatric sickness in relation to upper and lower limb.



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