Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 9165 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed538    
    Printed27    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded102    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
ARTICLE
Year : 1998  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 289-294

Comorbidity in Children with Mental Retardation


1 Associate Professor (Psychiatry), Central Institute of Psychiatry, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India
2 Clinical Psychologist, Central Institute of Psychiatry, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India
3 Resident (Psychiatry), Central Institute of Psychiatry, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India

Correspondence Address:
Christoday R. J Khess
Associate Professor (Psychiatry), Central Institute of Psychiatry, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21494486

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

This study was conducted in the child psychiatry unit of a tertiary psychiatric hospital. 60 patients diagnosed to have mental retardation according to ICD-10 (WHO, 1992) criteria constituted the study sample. A psychiatric disorder was present in 56.17% of the cases, and a medical disease was present in 35.0%. Only 13.3% cases had both a psychiatric as well as medical illness. Patients with a psychiatric illness were found to have a lesser degree of retardation. The commonest psychiatric disorder observed was behavioural and emotional disorders, while the commonest medical illness found was epilepsy. Patients with a medical illness were found to have a negative family history for a mental illness, and were much younger at the first consultation compared to the patients with a psychiatric illness. The above findings have been discussed, with emphasis on issues like dual diagnosis and diagnostic overshadowing.



[PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article