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ARTICLE
Year : 1999  |  Volume : 41  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 154-159

Buprenorphine Abuse in India : An Update


1 Junior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh-160 012, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh-160 012, India

Correspondence Address:
S K Mattoo
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh-160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21455379

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This study reviews the available Indian literature on buprenorphine abuse. Buprenorphine was introduced in 1986; the abuse, first noticed in 1987, increased rapidly till 1994, and then decreased gradually. Initiated through other addicts and medical practitioners, the abuse was mostly as a cheap, easily and legally available substitute for opioids. The typical young adult male abuser used an intravenous cocktail with diazepam, pheneramine or promethazine for a better kick. The withdrawal syndrome was typical of the opioids and without an expected delayed onset. Complications of pseudoaneurysm and recurrent koro in repeated withdrawal were reported. Buprenorphine as a detoxifying agent for opioids reportedly gave better symptom control in the first week but high rates of dependence induction were reported. The Indian data tends to caution against the Western enthusiasm to use buprenorphine for detoxification or maintenance of opioid abusers.



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