Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 1836 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed553    
    Printed35    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded129    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
ARTICLE
Year : 2000  |  Volume : 42  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 387-392

Treatment Setting and Follow-Up in Alcohol Dependence


1 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore-560 029, India
2 Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore-560 029, India

Correspondence Address:
Pratima Murthy
Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore-560 029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21407975

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

This study aimed at evaluating patient and treatment variables influencing six month treatment outcome in alcohol dependence. 134 serially registered patients selected their treatment setting as either outpatient or inpatient. Sociodemographic variables, alcohol consumption patterns, drinking consequences were measured at intake. Following treatment, drinking patterns and consequences were re-measured at three and six months follow up in each of the groups. 86 of 134 chose the inpatient program and 48 the outpatient program. Overall, 58 maintained total abstinence, and 11 had significantly reduced alcohol consumption at six months follow up. The inpatient group did marginally better than the outpatient group. More severely dependent patients, those with greater physical and psychosocial consequences opted for an inpatient program, and did well. Less severely dependent patients did favourably with outpatient intervention alone. Improvements made within the first three months tended to influence subsequent treatment compliance The observation that less severely dependent individuals who opted for outpatient services did favourably suggests that extensive treatment may be required only for those with more severe dependence or greater psychosocial consequences. Our findings also highlight the need for developing community based low cost interventions.



[PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article