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ARTICLE
Year : 2001  |  Volume : 43  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 36-40

Detection of Malingering Through the Use of Ravens Standard Progressive Matrices


1 Additional Professor & Head, Department of Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore - 560 029, India
2 Research Assistant, Department of Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore - 560 029

Correspondence Address:
Chittaranjan Andrade
Additional Professor & Head, Department of Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore - 560 029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21407836

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Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) has been suggested to assist in the detection of malingering, and a putatively validated formula method for defining genuine and fake performances is available In the present study, 47 normal individuals were asked to fake cognitive impairment on the SPM; a day later, their genuine performances were obtained. As expected, the genuine performances were significantly superior to the faked performances: however, the formula method failed to distinguish between the two. The present study used logistic regression analysis to model genuine and faked performances; the method resulted in a 74.5% accurate classification. It is concluded that, while the SPM may be useful in certain cases, it cannot reliably detect malingering.



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