Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 2002  |  Volume : 44  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 118-124

Convergent Validity of Quality of Life Interview (Qoli) in an Indian Setting : Preliminary Findings


1 Senior Resident, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Additional Professor, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Associate Professor, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
4 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Nitin Gupta
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21206556

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Quality of life research in India on patients with schizophrenia is scarce. Quality of life interview (QOLI), a commonly used instrument in the West has not been used in a developing country like India. The aim was to assess convergence validity of QOLI (modified as per the Indian cultural background). 38 clinically stable outpatients with chronic schizophrenia (as per ICD-10) were administered QOLI- Brief version. Quality of Life Scale (QLS) and WHOQOL- Bref over two interviews the latter two scales having cross-cultural applicability. Significant correlations were obtained for QOLI with QLS and WHOQOL-Bref. It can be concluded that QOLI demonstrated convergent validity with both a disease-specific (QLS) and a generic (WHOQOL-Bref) scale, which have been previously used in the Indian setting. Hence, results support the applicability of QOLI in a different sociocultural setting.



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