Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 60-61

Obsessive Slowness : A Case Report


1 Senior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India
3 Junior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012, India

Correspondence Address:
Gagandeep Singh
Senior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21206819

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Obsessive slowness is described to be a syndrome of extreme slowness in ways various tasks are performed. Its existence as an independent syndrome is challenged by authors, who regard it to be a part of obsessive compulsive disorder. Behavioural techniques of prompting, pacing and shaping are recommended for treatment of this condition. We describe here a case of a 21 year old male patient who presented with debilitating slowness. Patient responded to a combination of behaviour therapy (thought habituation and exposure) and pharmacotherapy (fluoxetine and thyroxine). Diagnostic difficulties and management issues are highlighted.



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