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CASE REPORT
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 255-256

Neurobiological Basis of Ganser Syndrome


1 Medical Student, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811, OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2 Resident, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811, OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3 Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811, OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

Correspondence Address:
N J Jacob
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811, OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21206870

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Ganser syndrome continues to be a rare and widely misunderstood condition. While DSM-IV classifies Ganser syndrome as a dissociative disorder, its etiology continues to be debated. There are episodic reports in the literature of Ganser syndrome in patients with head trauma or strokes. However, the mechanisms by which these cerebral insults lead to Ganser syndrome or other dissociative states are largely unknown.A case of a patient with Ganser syndrome with a prior history of stroke and bifrontal infarcts is described. This case demonstrates how organic pathology may predispose a patient to dissociative states, such as Ganser syndrome. We review the relationship between hyperglutamatergic states, caused by stroke and stress, and dissociative symptoms.Ganser syndrome continues to be a rare and widely misunderstood condition. While DSM-IV classifies Ganser syndrome as a dissociative disorder, its etiology continues to be debated. There are episodic reports in the literature of Ganser syndrome in patients with head trauma or strokes. However, the mechanisms by which these cerebral insults lead to Ganser syndrome or other dissociative states are largely unknown.A case of a patient with Ganser syndrome with a prior history of stroke and bifrontal infarcts is described. This case demonstrates how organic pathology may predispose a patient to dissociative states, such as Ganser syndrome. We review the relationship between hyperglutamatergic states, caused by stroke and stress, and dissociative symptoms.



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