Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 939 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4073    
    Printed100    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded267    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 106-111

Perceptions of drug use within a UK Bengali community


1 The Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment Service-Counties, OSL House, East Link, Meridian Business Park, Leicester, LE19 1XU, United Kingdom
2 Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Box PO25, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
3 Professor, Health and Social Care, Mary Seacole Research Centre, De Montfort University, Charles Fears Campus, 266 London Road, Leicester LE2 1RQ, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dinesh Bhugra
Department of Health Service and Population Research, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Box PO25, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.42397

Rights and Permissions

Aim: The study set out to explore the perceptions and knowledge of drug use of the Bangladeshi origin population in Leicester through local Mosques and community and resource centers for recruiting subjects. Setting and Design: A triangulated methodology was used for this research. A review of all available literature was carried out to establish if there was evidence of a drug problem among the Bangladeshis in the UK along with questionnaires and interviews. Materials and Methods: A triangulated methodology was used for this research. A review of all available literature was carried out along with questionnaires as well as semi-structured interviews using self-designed questionnaires. Results and Conclusions: Only 66 questionnaires (16.5%) were returned (46 males and 20 females). These and qualitative exploratory interviews with a small number of community leaders confirmed that drug-related problems exist among the Bangladeshi community, especially in the younger age group and are recognized as such but help seeking is often problematic. An understanding of the perceptions of the Bangladeshi population is useful in developing culturally appropriate services for this group.



[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article