Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 932 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3925    
    Printed139    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded365    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 7    

Recommend this journal

 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 227-232

Therapeutic efficacy of add-on yogasana intervention in stabilized outpatient schizophrenia: Randomized controlled comparison with exercise and waitlist


1 Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatric Social Work, and Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Director, Swami Vivekanananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (SVYASA), Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Shivarama Varambally
Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Hosur Road,Bangalore 560 029, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: EMR Research project funded by the Departmentof AYUSH, Govt. of India, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.102414

Rights and Permissions

Background: Schizophrenia is a highly disabling illness. Previous studies have shown yoga to be a feasible add-on therapy in schizophrenia. Aims: The current study aimed to test the efficacy of yoga as an add-on treatment in outpatients with schizophrenia. Settings and Design: The study done at a tertiary psychiatry center used a single blind randomized controlled design with active control and waitlist groups. Materials and Methods: Consenting patients with schizophrenia were randomized into yoga, exercise, or waitlist group. They continued to receive pharmacological therapy that was unchanged during the study. Patients in the yoga or exercise group were offered supervised daily procedures for one month. All patients were assessed by a blind rater at the start of the intervention and at the end of 4 months. Results: Kendall tau, a nonparametric statistical test, showed that significantly more patients in the yoga group improved in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative and total PANSS scores as well as social functioning scores compared with the exercise and waitlist group. Odds ratio analysis showed that the likelihood of improvement in yoga group in terms of negative symptoms was about five times greater than either the exercise or waitlist groups. Conclusion: In schizophrenia patients with several years of illness and on stabilized pharmacological therapy, one-month training followed by three months of home practices of yoga as an add-on treatment offered significant advantage over exercise or treatment as usual. Yoga holds promise as a complementary intervention in the management of schizophrenia.



[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article