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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 304-319

Suicide: An Indian perspective


1 Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
2 Department of Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajiv Radhakrishnan
Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.104793

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Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young adults worldwide. There is a growing recognition that prevention strategies need to be tailored to the region-specific demographics of a country and to be implemented in a culturally-sensitive manner. This review explores the historical, epidemiological and demographic factors of suicide in India and examines the strategies aimed at the prevention of suicide. There has been an increase in the rates of suicide in India over the years, although trends of both increases and decline in suicide rates have been present. Distinct from global demographic risk factors, In India, marital status is not necessarily protective and the female: male ratio in the rate of suicide is higher. The motives and modes of suicide are also distinct from western countries. Preventive strategies implemented at a community level and identifying vulnerable individuals maybe more effective than global strategies.



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