Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 6541 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3978    
    Printed89    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded593    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 117-124

People with mental illness and human rights: A developing countries perspective


1 College of Nursing, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Nursing, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Vijayalakshmi Poreddi
College of Nursing, Department of Nursing, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore - 560 029, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.111447

Rights and Permissions

Background: Human rights violations among the people with mental illness were not an uncommon occurrence. The present study was aimed to compare persons with psychiatric illness and their caregivers' perceptions regarding the human rights status of people with mental illness in the community. Materials and Methods: A descriptive design was carried out among randomly selected asymptomatic psychiatric patients and their caregivers (N=200) at a tertiary care center. Data was collected through face-to-face interview, using a structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed and interpreted using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: Our findings revealed that the caregivers than psychiatric patients perceived negatively to the statements i.e., 'Receiving equal information and encouragement about career opportunities' (χ2=10.779, P<0.029), 'Opposing discriminatory actions, slurs' (χ2=9.472, P<0.050) 'Resolving the conflicts with people with mental illness through nonviolent ways' (χ2=27.091, P<0.000), 'Responding to the complaints of harassment or discrimination against the people with mental illness' (χ2=18.697, P<0.001), 'Encouraged to continue their education' (χ2=13.029, P<0.023) 'Exploitation by the community members' (χ2=18.653, P<0.001) and working under fair conditions (χ2=13.470, P<0.009). Conclusion: The study suggests that there is an urgent need to take necessary steps to protect, promote, and fulfill human rights of people with mental illness through providing care, educating the community, and strengthening the legislations.



[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article