Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 195-200

Does Guru Granth Sahib describe depression?


1 Department of Psychiatry, M. G. M. Medical College and Hospital, M. G. M. University of Health Sciences, Kamothe, New-Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Cultural Psychiatry and Epidemiology, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom
3 Department of Health Service and Population Research, Institute of Psychiatry, Mental Health and Cultural Diversity, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Gurvinder Kalra
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, M. G. M. Medical College and Hospital, M. G. M. University of Health Sciences, Kamothe, New-Mumbai - 410 209, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.105531

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Sikhism is a relatively young religion, with Guru Granth Sahib as its key religious text. This text describes emotions in everyday life, such as happiness, sadness, anger, hatred, and also more serious mental health issues such as depression and psychosis. There are references to the causation of these emotional disturbances and also ways to get out of them. We studied both the Gurumukhi version and the English translation of the Guru Granth Sahib to understand what it had to say about depression, its henomenology, and religious prescriptions for recovery. We discuss these descriptions in this paper and understand its meaning within the context of clinical depression. Such knowledge is important as explicit descriptions about depression and sadness can help encourage culturally appropriate assessment and treatment, as well as promote public health through education.



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