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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 56  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 246-252

Nonmedical use of sedatives in urban Bengaluru


1 Department of Nursing, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, Center for Addiction Medicine, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Prasanthi Nattala
Department of Nursing, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: The study is funded by Fogarty International Center, USA (Advanced In-Country Research Grant No. TW05811-08; PI: Linda B. Cottler),, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.140619

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Background: Nonmedical sedative use is emerging as a serious problem in India. However, there is paucity of literature on the patterns of use in the population. Aim: The aim of the present analysis was to explore sedative use patterns in an urban metropolis. Materials and Methods: Data for the present analysis come from the parent study on nonmedical prescription drug use in Bengaluru, India. Participants (n = 717) were recruited using a mall-intercept approach, wherein they were intercepted in five randomly selected shopping malls, and administered an interview on their use of prescription drugs. Results: Past 12-month nonmedical sedative use was reported by 12%, benzodiazepines being the commonest. Reasons cited for nonmedical use included "sleeplessness, pain relief, stress." A majority (73%) reported sedative use "in ways other than as prescribed," compared to "use without prescription" (27%). All prescriptions were issued by general physicians in private hospitals. About 11% among those who used "in ways other than as prescribed," and 100% of nonprescribed users, reported irregular use (skipping doses/stopping/restarting). Among those who used "in ways other than prescribed," pharmacy stores were the source of obtaining the sedatives. Among "nonprescribed users," family/friends were the main source. Three-percent reported using sedatives and alcohol together in the same use episode. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, nonmedical sedative use was significantly associated with graduation-level education or above (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.53, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-4.91), and married status (aOR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.04-5.18). Conclusions: Findings underscore the need for considering various contextual factors in tailoring preventive interventions for reducing nonmedical sedative use.



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