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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 264-274

Management of bipolar disorders in women by nonpharmacological methods


Department of Psychiatry, Chhattisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sujit Kumar Naik
Department of Psychiatry, Chhattisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur - 495 001, Chhattisgarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.161490

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Several reasons justify the need for nonpharmacological interventions for bipolar disorder (BD) in women. This review focuses on psychosocial therapies for BDs in women. The research evidence for a wide range of psychosocial interventions for the management of BDs in women has been presented. All the interventions have some common components like targeting disease management, information regarding illness, and coping skills. There also are distinctive features like cognitive restructuring and self-rated mood charts in cognitive behavior therapy, regulation of sleep/wake cycles and daily routines in interpersonal sleep regulation therapy, and communication skill training in family treatments. Many psychosocial interventions hold promise as adjunctive therapies for bipolar patients. In India, there is a considerable dearth of literature in this area due lack of skilled staff for psychosocial interventions. Future trials need to: Clarify which populations are most likely to benefit from which strategies; identify putative mechanisms of action; systematically evaluate costs, benefits, and generalizability of effects, and record adverse effects.



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