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LETTERS TO EDITOR  
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 519
Antidepressant compliance in a rural setting


1 Department of Psychiatry, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Mumbai, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Psychiatry, D.Y. Patil Hospital, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Psychiatry, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

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Date of Web Publication18-Jan-2018
 

How to cite this article:
Thakurdesai A, Karia S, Satish S, Harshe D, Tripathi A. Antidepressant compliance in a rural setting. Indian J Psychiatry 2017;59:519

How to cite this URL:
Thakurdesai A, Karia S, Satish S, Harshe D, Tripathi A. Antidepressant compliance in a rural setting. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Oct 23];59:519. Available from: http://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?2017/59/4/519/223479




Sir,

The PACECAR study [1] is pathbreaking; for the first time, antidepressant drug compliance in rural India has been a subject of study. We wish to offer some comments on the methods and findings of the study.

The sample recruitment was not naturalistic; therefore, we wonder whether patients would have behaved naturalistically. Next, it is not clear whether attempts were made to improve compliance such as through patient education about efficacy and adverse effects, or whether attempts were made to improve tolerability through the use of adjunctive psychopharmacological treatments. These are also naturalistic interventions.

The sample should have been better described; the age data appear incomplete. Of interest, different drugs were escalated to therapeutic or peak doses after different intervals, and this could have influenced their efficacy and tolerability. Finally, we suggest that decision-making and assessments could have been made objective such as through the use of simple and easy-to-use instruments such as the Clinical Global Impression scales for severity and improvement.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Rao TSS, Manohar JS, Raman R, Darshan MS, Tandon A, Karthik KN, et al. The prospective, 24-week assessment of cost-efficacy of and compliance to antidepressant medications in a rural setting (PACECAR) study. Indian J Psychiatry 2017;59:157-63.  Back to cited text no. 1
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Correspondence Address:
Abha Thakurdesai
Department of Psychiatry, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Mumbai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_318_17

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