Year : 2004  |  Volume : 46  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 39--51

Prevalence, Pattern and Predictors of Mental Health Morbidity Following an Intermediate Disaster in an Urban Slum in Delhi : A Modified Cohort Study


Nimesh G Desai1, Dhanesh K Gupta2, Raj Kumar Srivastava3 
1 Prof. & Head, Dept. of Psychiatry and Medical Superintendent, Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences (IHBAS), Dilshad Garden, Delhi 110 095, India
2 Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences, Dilshad Garden, Delhi 110 095, India
3 Senior Resident, Dept. of Psychiatry, Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences, Dilshad Garden, Delhi 110 095, India

Correspondence Address:
Nimesh G Desai
Prof. & Head, Dept. of Psychiatry and Medical Superintendent, Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences (IHBAS), Dilshad Garden, Delhi 110 095
India

The present study reports on the findings from an ICMR supported Research Project on the mental health consequences and service needs of the population of an urban slum in Delhi affected by an intermediate fire disaster. The study was aimed at examining the prevalence, the pattern and the predictors of mental health morbidity in the disaster affected population. Modified cohort design was used , with a control group, and two stage assessments for the prevalence of psychiatric disorder at two years after the disaster, with GHQ-12 and SCAN based clinical interview with ICD-10-DCR.. The data were analysed using r2 test and independent SQtSQ test for inter group comparison and stepwise logistic regression for finding predictors of psychiatric morbidity and psychological ill health. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders was significantly higher (78/1,000 v/s 22/1,000), and the prevalence of psychological ill health was also higher (232/1000 v/s 50/1000), as compared to the control group. The commonest psychiatric disorders were Depression, Substance Use Disorders, Generalised Anxiety Disorder, and Somatoform Disorders. The commonest symptoms of psychological ill health were suggestive of depression. Age and participation in relief work were found to be strong predictors, and physical injuries were found to be a weak predictor of mental health morbidity. The findings have important implications in the service delivery and research on mental health aspects of disasters, which are highlighted and discussed.


How to cite this article:
Desai NG, Gupta DK, Srivastava RK. Prevalence, Pattern and Predictors of Mental Health Morbidity Following an Intermediate Disaster in an Urban Slum in Delhi : A Modified Cohort Study.Indian J Psychiatry 2004;46:39-51


How to cite this URL:
Desai NG, Gupta DK, Srivastava RK. Prevalence, Pattern and Predictors of Mental Health Morbidity Following an Intermediate Disaster in an Urban Slum in Delhi : A Modified Cohort Study. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2004 [cited 2020 May 27 ];46:39-51
Available from: http://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/article.asp?issn=0019-5545;year=2004;volume=46;issue=1;spage=39;epage=51;aulast=Desai;type=0