Year : 2020  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 178--185

Subjective cognitive complaints and its relation to objective cognitive performance, clinical profile, clinical insight, and social functioning in patients of schizophrenia: A cross-sectional study


Sachin Pradeep Baliga1, Ravindra M Kamath2, Jahnavi S Kedare2 
1 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, Topiwala National Medical College and BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sachin Pradeep Baliga
Department of Psychiatry, Topiwala National Medical College and BYL Nair Charitable Hospital, A L Nair Road, Mumbai - 400 008, Maharashtra
India

Context: Neurocognitive deficits are well documented in schizophrenia. Neurocognitive insight (NI), described as awareness of neurocognitive deficits, has not been evaluated in the Indian context. Its relation to clinical profile and social functioning also remains unexplored. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and their relation to objective cognitive performance, clinical profile, clinical insight, and social functioning in patients of schizophrenia. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional study at the outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred individuals with schizophrenia were evaluated using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Subjective Scale To Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia, abbreviated version of Scale to Assess Unawareness in Mental Disorders, and Schizophrenia Research Foundation–Social Functioning Index. Cognitive performance was assessed using (1) Digit Span Test (attention) from Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, 3rd edition and (2) Passages Test (explicit memory), (3) Verbal n-back Test (working memory), and (4) Stroop Test (executive functioning) from the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences Battery. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests, and Pearson's coefficient of correlation. Results: Participants showed impairment in all cognitive domains. Except for working memory, there was no correlation between SCC and objective performance for other cognitive domains correspondingly, implying poor NI. Severity of psychosis and clinical insight did not have any correlation with SCC. Higher SCC correlated with poorer social functioning, especially in “occupational” and “other social roles” domains. Conclusions: Individuals with schizophrenia have poor NI. This is independent of severity of psychosis or clinical insight into illness. Socio-occupational functioning and depression should be actively enquired into when patients present with SCC.


How to cite this article:
Baliga SP, Kamath RM, Kedare JS. Subjective cognitive complaints and its relation to objective cognitive performance, clinical profile, clinical insight, and social functioning in patients of schizophrenia: A cross-sectional study.Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:178-185


How to cite this URL:
Baliga SP, Kamath RM, Kedare JS. Subjective cognitive complaints and its relation to objective cognitive performance, clinical profile, clinical insight, and social functioning in patients of schizophrenia: A cross-sectional study. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jun 4 ];62:178-185
Available from: http://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/article.asp?issn=0019-5545;year=2020;volume=62;issue=2;spage=178;epage=185;aulast=Baliga;type=0