Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 1991  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 291-292

Psychopathology of Confabulations in Head Injury


1 Psychiatrist, ICMR Project, Department of Neurosurgery, Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India
2 Psychologist, ICMR Project, Department of Neurosurgery, Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India
3 Chief Investigator (Former), ICMR Project, Department of Neurosurgery, Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, India

Correspondence Address:
S Sabhesan
Psychiatrist, ICMR Project, Department of Neurosurgery, Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21897473

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Confabulations observed during head injury recovery were of two types ; momentary and fantastic. Both occurred in relation to either the dysmnestic phase of early recovery or the post traumatic amnesic syndrome. In a follow-up of 174 head injured patients, all 12 patients evincing confabulations had suffered from acceleration injuries. In comparison to controls, they had a longer post traumatic amnesia period. Clinical and psychometric lateralization of the deficits pointed to left sided impairment. Their memory scores were not qualitatively or quantitatively different from those of equivalent controls. Patients differed from the controls in certain personality dimensions. Relative contribution of clinical deficits, memory impairment and personality dimensions to the occurrence of confabulations and its dynamic significance in maintaining the personal identity system of the patient are discussed.



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