Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 4841 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed545    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded37    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
ARTICLE
Year : 1997  |  Volume : 39  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 247-250

Psychosocial Aspects of Amputation


1 Senior Resident, Department of Psychiatry, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
2 Professor, Department of Psychiatry, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
3 Psychiatry, Medical Officer, Provincial Medical Services, Basti, India
4 Professor & Head (Retd), Department of Orthopedics, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
5 Associate Professor, Department of Orthopedics, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
6 Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India
7 Statistician, Department of Psychiatry, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow, India

Correspondence Address:
J K Trivedi
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, K.G. Medical College, Lucknow
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21584082

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Twenty-five subjects were studied who had undergone amputation 6 months to 2 years prior to the time of assessment. The sample was divided into sick (those having psychiatric illness) and non-sick (those without any psychiatric illness) groups, and then compared for various life events following the amputation. It was seen that those who were labelled as psychiatrically sick had more work impairment, change in job, socioeconomic difficulties and social avoidance. The latter two factors were also significantly more in right upper limb amputees than the left upper limb amputees; no such difference existed between the upper and lower limb amputees.



[PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article