Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ARTICLE
Year : 2002  |  Volume : 44  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 125-130

A Factor Analytic Study of Panic Symptoms


1 Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Sarjapur Road, Bangalore-560034, India
2 Professor, Department of Psychiatry, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Sarjapur Road, Bangalore-560034, India

Correspondence Address:
K. Srinivasan
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Sarjapur Road, Bangalore-560034
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 21206557

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We studied 94 panic subjects with a view to identify clinical subtypes of panic disorder. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation of 13 DSM-IV panic symptoms yielded four clinically meaningful factors. Factor I with hot flushes, trembling and sweating was suggestive of a general autonomic hyperactivity. Factor II had cognitive symptoms such as fear of loss of control or going crazy and derealisation. Factor III was mixed in nature but had symptoms of fear of dying and chest pain. Factor-IV had respiratory symptoms in the form of choking sensation and being short of breath. These findings are compared to earlier studies of factor analysis of panic symptoms reported from the West. Clinical implications of sub-types of panic disorder have been highlighted.



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