Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 214-217

Catatonia from its creation to DSM-V: Considerations for ICD


Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Stony Brook University, Long Island, New York, USA

Correspondence Address:
Max Fink
Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Stony Brook University, Long Island, P.O. Box 457, St. James, New York, 11780
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.86810

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Catatonia was delineated only as a type of schizophrenia in the many American Psychiatric Association DSM classifications and revisions from 1952 until 1994 when "catatonia secondary to a medical condition" was added. Since the 1970s the diagnosis of catatonia has been clarified as a syndrome of rigidity, posturing, mutism, negativism, and other motor signs of acute onset. It is found in about 10% of psychiatric hospital admissions, in patients with depressed and manic mood states and in toxic states. It is quickly treatable to remission by benzodiazepines and by ECT. The DSM-V revision proposes catatonia in two major diagnostic classes, specifiers for 10 principal diagnoses, and deletion of the designation of schizophrenia, catatonic type. This complex recommendation serves no clinical or research purpose and confuses treatment options. Catatonia is best considered in the proposed ICD revision as a unique syndrome of multiple forms warranting a single unique defined class similar to that of delirium.



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