Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 215-223

Sufism and mental health


1 Department of Psychiatry, Central Institute of Psychiatry, Ranchi, India
2 School of Psychology, University of Wales, Bangor, United Kingdom
3 Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences, Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
S Haque Nizamie
Central Institute of Psychiatry, Ranchi - 834 006
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Read associated Erratum: Erratum: Sufism and Mental Health with this article

DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.105535

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Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well‑being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health.



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