Year : 2020  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 448--449

Reply to the comments on “Psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on general population in West Bengal: A cross-sectional study”


Kaustav Chakraborty1, Moumita Chatterjee2,  
1 Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and J.N.M. Hospital, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine and J.N.M. Hospital, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Kaustav Chakraborty
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and J.N.M. Hospital, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal
India




How to cite this article:
Chakraborty K, Chatterjee M. Reply to the comments on “Psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on general population in West Bengal: A cross-sectional study”.Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:448-449


How to cite this URL:
Chakraborty K, Chatterjee M. Reply to the comments on “Psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on general population in West Bengal: A cross-sectional study”. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Aug 1 ];62:448-449
Available from: https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?2020/62/4/448/291003


Full Text



Sir,

We sincerely appreciate the points raised by the authors after they went through our published article in the latest issue of Indian Journal of Psychiatry.[1] We cannot deny that many of the criticisms raised were valid ones. However, we would like to offer clarifications on few of the points raised. First, we apologize for the typographical error where “general population” was replaced by “general public” in the aim of the study. As you can see that only at a single place, this has occurred and elsewhere it has been put as “general population.” Second, the survey questionnaire was independently reviewed by two consultant psychiatrists and one clinical psychologist and their suggestions were incorporated and it was pretested on a sample of 15 subjects. However, we did not check for the internal consistency of the questionnaire, which was a serious drawback. Third, the questionnaire was sent through WhatsApp to various nonmedico social groups and they were asked to fill up their mobile number and E-mail id (if any) in the Google Form and the data were checked for duplicity. However, we acknowledge the inherent drawbacks in such survey which has been mentioned by Ameen and Praharaj which are applicable for this study too.[2] Fifth, this survey purposefully excluded the medical personnel (but not other health care providers) because the authors were of the opinion that pandemic would have a different kind of psychological impact in this particular group. Sixth, the authors are right in mentioning that “85.27% of total population speaks Bengali and only 1.71% of total population speaks English,” but we could not understand how it prevents the investigators from keeping “able to read English” as an inclusion criterion. Ability to read English and speaking English fluently are two different things altogether. The questionnaire was circulated in social groups where the investigators were member(s) and most of the people in those groups are able to read and comprehend English. Seventh, the survey included a question “Do you think that COVID19 pandemic has posed a threat to your existence?” On the basis of responses to this question, the authors concluded that “one-fourth of the respondents…….threatened their existence.” Eighth, we do not think that in the conclusion, we claimed anything extraordinary which was beyond the scope of this survey. Rather, we reiterated the findings of the survey in the conclusion section. We once again want to emphasize that this survey was an attempt to present the data about the psychological impact of pandemic on general population in its original form with its inherent limitations. We did not aim for any inferential statistics for that matter.

Acknowledgment

None.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Chakraborty K, Chatterjee M. Psychological impact of COVID 19 pandemic on general population in West Bengal: A cross sectional study. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:266-72.
2Ameen S, Praharaj SK. Problems in using WhatsApp groups for survey research. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:327-8.